Events

Featured Listing
Space Station Explorers
Space Station Explorers

Space Station Explorers is a community of educators, learners, and organizations that make STEM learning fun and exciting through connections with the International Space Station (ISS) National Lab.

Featured Listing
Excellence Awards in Science & Engineering
Excellence Awards in Science & Engineering

The downloadable pdf from the Excellence Awards in Science & Engineering has a wealth of resources, including content from: NSF, Dept of Education, NSTC, Army, Smithsonian Institute, USDA, Dept of Energy, EPA, NASA, NOAA and more.

NASA: STEMonstration - Engineering Design: Trusses
NASA

Expedition 55/56 Flight Engineer Ricky Arnold explains the significance of these resilient structures and the forces they are up against in microgravity.

NASA: STEMonstration – Spacewalking
NASA

Watch Expedition 55/56 flight engineer Ricky Arnold in this two-part episode as he explains spacewalk safety and training in addition to the parts of the spacesuit that protects astronauts outside the space station.

NASA: STEMonstration – Solar Energy
NASA

Watch Expedition 55/56 Flight Engineer Ricky Arnold as he explains the station’s solar arrays and the importance of solar energy on the space station.

NASA: STEMonstration – Sleep Science
NASA

Watch Expedition 55/56 Flight Engineer Ricky Arnold discuss the crew sleeping quarters, why sleep is important and how they adapt for circadian rhythms aboard the space station.

NASA: International Toys in Space
NASA

Astronauts tested 16 toys to learn how the laws of physics would affect the behaviors of the toys.

Nickelodeon: Slime in Space - A Virtual Field Trip
Nickelodeon

What happens when you send Nickelodeon slime to the International Space Station?

Space Station Explorers: "A Beautiful Planet" Educator Resource Guide
Space Station Explorers

Embark on an awe-inspiring trip around our world through the eyes of astronauts on the ISS.

Brains On! Living Large with the International Space Station
Brains On!

The International Space Station sits 250 miles above Earth, but how did it get there?